Sea-Ice

Web Content Image

Sea-ice is formed from ocean water that freezes, whether along coasts or to the sea floor (fast ice) or floating on the surface (drift ice) or packed together (pack ice). The most important areas of pack ice are the polar ice packs. Because of vast amounts of water added to or removed from the oceans and atmosphere, the behavior of polar ice packs have a significant impact of the global changes in climate.

Copernicu Sentinel-1's SAR mission and Sentinel-3's SLSTR mission support sea-ice monitoring. SLSTR also monitors sea-ice temperature. Sentinel-3's ALT mission supports sea-ice monitoring.

Thematic Results

On 8 November 2020, the 9th edition of the world's unique sailing race—the Vendée Globe—set off from Les Sables-d'Olonne in western France, with a route of some 25,000 nautical miles (approximately 46,000 km) going through the Atlantic and into the heart of the Southern Ocean. Data from the Copernicus Sentinel-1 satellite have been used to identify risky iceberg areas, providing the safest route for the skippers.

The Copernicus Marine Service has released a new ocean information product. The Ocean Monitoring Indicators (OMIs) are free downloadable datasets which cover the past 25 years of key variables used in monitoring oceanic trends in line with climate change, including ocean warming, sea level rise and melting of sea ice. This free and open ocean information allows users to track the vital health signs of the ocean over the past quarter of a century.

Sea ice is a rapidly changing phenomenon. Timely measurements over large areas, at high spatial and temporal resolutions, are fundamental for its surveillance.

The international iceberg patrol service set up after the sinking of the Titanic is now able to track drifting ice from orbit more swiftly through ESA-backed cloud computing.

Multiple satellites, including Europe's Sentinels, have captured images of two large icebergs that broke away from Antarctica's Nansen ice shelf on 7 April.

How can access to Sentinel data increase Canada's ability to offer improved information on sea ice?

While sailing south of Africa on an around-the-world voyage, Matteo Miceli was suddenly alerted to a massive iceberg in his path. Almost 4 km long, the iceberg drifting near the Prince Edward Islands was detected and tracked by European satellites.

Within the first days of its operational life, the Sentinel-1A satellite has provided data for marine services in the Arctic.

Using satellites for improving the exploitation of water resources is just one of the innovative ideas developed over the week-long 'camp' dedicated to creating mobile apps drawing on Earth observation data.

How do measurements from satellites flying above Earth provide essential information on the effects of climate change on our planet? Scientific and political organisations considered the question in London today.

From climate change monitoring to supporting humanitarian aid and crisis situations, early data applications from the month-old Sentinel-1A satellite show how the radar mission's critical observations can be used to keep us and our planet safe.

Sentinel-1A, Europe's first satellite for Copernicus, is almost ready for launch on 3 April. Meanwhile, ESA is showing how its advanced radar will map ice, monitor subsidence and much more.

Like thermometers in the sky, satellite instruments can measure the temperatures of Earth's surfaces. ESA's new GlobTemperature project is merging these data from a variety of spaceborne sensors to provide scientists with a one-stop shop for land, lake and ice temperature data.

The international body representing the oil and gas industry is promoting the use of satellite Earth observation as the industry explores new frontiers. The upcoming Sentinel suite of satellites will facilitate these new endeavours.

Those who need satellite data for a wide range of applications, from mapping sea ice and tracking maritime traffic to monitoring geohazards over land, are eagerly awaiting the launch of Sentinel-1. ESA is helping users get ahead of the game by offering test data and simulated images.

ESA joined international delegates in Doha, Qatar, to discuss how satellite observations show our planet's most sensitive areas reacting to climate change - and how this information is useful to the people living there.

In May 2012, two earthquakes struck Italy's Emilia-Romagna region, claiming at least 27 lives and causing widespread damage. Through GMES, damage assessment maps derived from satellite data were promptly produced to assist emergency response activities.

The loss of the Envisat satellite is affecting services by Europe's Global Monitoring for Environment and Security programme. Efforts are being coordinated with other space agencies to fill some of the gaps, but the situation adds further urgency to launch the Sentinel missions.

Navigation Menu